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Welcome to life in Nursery at Lowther from Mrs Murphy and her team of learners
 

Please see below for some examples of the amazing work we've been doing

 
 
Nursery Curriculum Forecast
Curriculum PDF  
 

Nursery Curriculum Forecast PDF link

 
Early Years Foundation Stage Guides
 
 

The Early Years Foundation StageĀ (Nursery and Reception classes) at Lowther has an exciting and creative curriculum. To find out more about life in Early Years at Lowther and our curriculum offer please follow these links:

 
  Early Years FS Outline PDF link  
  Phonics Phonemes Graphemes PDF link  
  Reading at Home PDF link  
  Tapestry Programme PDF link  
  What to expect in EYFS PDF link  
  Guidance for EYFS PDF link  
Maths Calculation Policy and Guides
 
 

Here you will find some helpful calculation guides for early years through to year 6 for maths learning and practice. Please click on the images to display/download the full documents in PDF Format.

 
  Calculation EYFS Early Maths PDF Link  
  Year 1 Calculation Guide PDF Link  
  Year 2 Calculation Guide PDF Link  
  Year 3 Calculation Guide PDF Link  
  Year 4 Calculation Guide PDF Link  
  Year 5 Calculation Guide PDF Link  
  Year 6 Calculation Guide PDF Link  
 
Nursery activities
 
 

 
Our first few weeks in Chestnut Nursery
 
 

 
Letters and sounds in the Nursery
 
 

Phonics in the Nursery is only a small part of the childrens learning. At Lowther we follow Letters and Sounds from the Government guidelines of teaching phonics. This is six phases of learning from which runs from Nursery into Year 2.

Phase One of Letters and Sounds concentrates on developing children's speaking and listening skills and lays the foundations for the phonic work which starts in Phase 2 at the beginning of reception. The emphasis during Phase 1 is to get children attuned to the sounds around them and ready to begin developing oral blending and segmenting skills.

It is intended that each of the first six aspects should be dipped into, rather than going through them in any order, with a balance of activities. Aspect 7 will usually come later, when children have had plenty of opportunity to develop their sound discrimination skills.

More details of our phonics programme are available to view/download here

 
 
Aspect 1 - General sound discrimination - environmental
 
 

The aim of this aspect is to raise children's awareness of the sounds around them and to develop their listening skills. Activities suggested in the guidance include going on a listening walk, drumming on different items outside and comparing the sounds, playing a sounds lotto game and making shakers.

 
 
Aspect 2 - General sound discrimination - instrumental sounds
 
 

This aspect aims to develop children's awareness of sounds made by various instruments and noise makers. Activities include comparing and matching sound makers, playing instruments alongside a story and making loud and quiet sounds.

 
 
Aspect 3 - General sound discrimination - body percussion
 
 

The aim of this aspect is to develop children's awareness of sounds and rhythms. Activities include singing songs and action rhymes, listening to music and developing a sounds vocabulary.

 
 
Aspect 4 - Rhythm and rhyme
 
 

This aspect aims to develop children's appreciation and experiences of rhythm and rhyme in speech. Activities include rhyming stories, rhyming bingo, clapping out the syllables in words and odd one out.

 
 
Aspect 5 - Alliteration
 
 

The focus is on initial sounds of words, with activities including I-Spy type games and matching objects which begin with the same sound.

 
 
Aspect 6 - Voice sounds
 
 

The aim is to distinguish between different vocal sounds and to begin oral blending and segmenting. Activities include Metal Mike, where children feed pictures of objects into a toy robot's mouth and the teacher sounds out the name of the object in a robot voice - /c/-/u/-/p/ cup, with the children joining in.

 
 
Aspect 7 - Oral blending and segmenting
 
 

In this aspect, the main aim is to develop oral blending and segmenting skills.

To practise oral blending, the teacher could say some sounds, such as /c/-/u/-/p/ and see whether the children can pick out a cup from a group of objects. For segmenting practise, the teacher could hold up an object such as a sock and ask the children which sounds they can hear in the word sock.

The activities introduced in Phase 1 are intended to continue throughout the following phases, as lots of practice is needed before children will become confident in their phonic knowledge and skills.

 
 
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